Conference schedule

Friday "DNA Day" Schedule

2:00pm Registration
2:30pm

Genetic Genealogy: A Beginner’s Guide

Melissa Johnson, CG

3:45pm

Diving Deeper into Genetic Genealogy

Melissa Johnson, CG

5:00pm Dinner
6:30pm

Using Autosomal DNA in Genealogy

Melissa Johnson, CG

7:30pm

DNA Panel Discussion:

Saturday Schedule

8:00am Doors Open for Registration and Refreshments
9:00am Welcome
9:15am

Galicia: An Ethnic and Religious Melting Pot

Zbigniew Stettner

10:30am

Finding Families in Russian Era Ukraine: Census Records and More

Rhoda Miller, CG

Ukrainian Catholics in America: A History

Rev. Dr. Ivan Kaszczak

11:30am-1:00pm Lunch
1:00pm

1920s-1940s Polish State Archives Records for Lemkos

Zbigniew Stettner

Ten Ways to Jumpstart Your Eastern European Research

Lisa Alzo

2:15pm

Workshop

Using 19th century Cadastral Maps to Trace Our Galician Ancestors

Zbigniew Stettner

Did My Great-Grandmother Have a Family?: A Problem Solving Case Study

Rhoda Miller, CG

3:30pm

Immigrant Cluster Communities: Past, Present and Future

Lisa Alzo

4:30pm Closing Remarks & Door Prize Drawings

Friday "DNA Day" Sessions:

Genetic Genealogy: A Beginner’s Guide

This lecture covers the basics of genetic genealogy and how it can be used to supplement traditional documentation for genealogical research. Learn about the three basic types of DNA testing that are useful for genetic genealogy: Y-chromosome, autosomal, and mitochondrial DNA tests, the key testing companies, how to understand the test results, and resources for learning more about genetic genealogy.

Diving Deeper into Genetic Genealogy

Learn more than the basics about DNA testing and how it can be useful to supplement the traditional paper trail for genealogical research. Discover more about using the testing companies’ websites to analyze and compare test results, how to use third party tools for analysis, and how to develop targeted testing plans to solve genealogical problems and brick walls.

Using Autosomal DNA in Genealogy

Discover more about using autosomal DNA to solve problems and break through genealogical brick walls. This lecture covers the basics of autosomal DNA, including X-DNA analysis and inheritance patterns, chromosome browsing, and testing plans, as well as several case studies.

 

Saturday Sessions:

Galicia: An Ethnic and Religious Melting Pot

In Galicia people of many different nationalities and religions lived together, worked, loved (sometimes married and/or had children), argued or even fought with each other. Knowing the history and dynamics of changes may help us better understand life of our ancestors and, sometimes, give us clues for finding them. Mr. Stettner will describe ethnic and religious mixture in Galicia and show how this knowledge can help us trace our ancestors.

Finding Families in Russian Era Ukraine: Census Records and More

The Russian Empire compiled information about households in census-like records from 1719 until 1858, various lists from time to time thereafter, and an Empire-wide census in 1897. Using document examples from the Pale of Settlement, this session will explain how families can be followed from one Revision List to the next. This session will also demonstrate the importance of knowing an ancestor’s place of registration for finding related records.

Ukrainian Catholics in America: A History

In 1869 the Austro-Hungarian Empire permitted emigration outside its borders. Hundreds of Thousands of its citizens took advantage of this opportunity to seek out a new beginning. This presentation will focus on the Ruthenian Greek Catholics who immigrated to the United States and established both Churches and cultural institutions. In time, this first wave of immigrants developed stable faith and cultural communities. The various strains of ethnic affiliations, Ruthenian and Ukrainian, produced both tension and growth. This presentation will focus on the period from 1869 until 1918. We will study some of the major sources, both primary and secondary, that paint a picture of the first valiant pioneers who formed the foundation of several ethnic, religious and cultural institutions.

1920s-1940s Polish State Archives Records for Lemkos

Records from this time-frame can tell us about the fate of your families that stayed in Lemkivshina. If your ancestors came from this area then, they certainly left some relatives there and they lived there for a number of decades until they were resettled to either Ukraine or North-East Poland. Records I will be talking about can tell us how they lived, when and where were moved (so may help to find living relatives), and what they left.

Ten Ways to Jumpstart Your Eastern European Research

Curious about your East European roots but don’t know where to begin? This session will show you how to “jumpstart your genealogy!” Learn the basics of how to investigate your family’s history using both traditional and online sources. Discover which records to tap into to identify your ancestral village, and how history impacts genealogical research. Tips for contacting possible relatives and writing to foreign archives, as well as strategies for overcoming the most common pitfalls and problems will also be discussed.

Did My Great-Grandmother Have a Family?: A Problem Solving Case Study

Do you have a “floating” female ancestor that cannot be attached to a larger tree? This case study of a Sub-Carpathian woman will demonstrate ways to break through that brick wall with problem-solving strategies utilizing records, oral history, photographs, DNA, mapping, and cluster techniques.

Immigrant Cluster Communities: Past, Present and Future

There are a handful of “cluster” immigrant communities throughout the United States that blossomed during the immigration influx of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Exploring “cluster genealogy”—the process of researching those relatives, friends, and neighbors who lived near an ancestor—can often break down brick walls in the search for individual family lines and help to place our ancestors’ lives in historical context. For those descendants who’ve moved away from such traditional immigrant enclaves, 21st-century technology can be used to rebuild “cluster communities” in the virtual world. This lecture will cover: How to identify chain migrations/cluster communities using key records; ways to share and collaborate with other researchers, and the benefits, pitfalls, and obstacles associate with a shift to “virtual” cluster communities; and how to use tools such as social networking sites, Wikis, etc. build online genealogical communities.

WORKSHOP: Using 19th century Cadastral Maps to Trace Our Galician Ancestors

19th century cadastral records can give us valuable information about our ancestors from Galicia that may not be available otherwise. We can learn how much land they had, where exactly they lived and more. I will show how to find the records in archives, how to interpret them and will teach how to compare cadastral maps with current maps using various software and websites and how to find the places where our ancestors' house were located.


 

Speaker Biographies

Lisa A. Alzo, M.F.A., is a freelance writer, instructor, and internationally recognized lecturer, specializing in Slovak/Eastern European genealogical research, writing your family history, and using the Internet to trace female and immigrant ancestors. She is the author of ten books and hundreds of magazine articles.

Dr. Volodymyr Bodnar is the administrator of the Family Tree DNA's Ukrainian DNA Project and FB's "Ukrainian DNA Genealogy - Український ДНК-родовід" group.

Melissa Johnson is a board-certified genealogist specializing in New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, and British families. She focuses on genealogical research from the colonial period to the present; family history writing, editing and publishing; dual citizenship for Italy and Ireland; DNA adoption research, and lineage society applications. She is currently the Reviews Editor of Association of Professional Genealogists Quarterly (APGQ), and Editor of the Genealogical Society of New Jersey Newsletter. Melissa is also on the Board of Trustees of the Genealogical Society of New Jersey (GSNJ) and the International Society for British Genealogy and Family History (ISBGFH).

Rev. Dr. Ivan Kaszczak, a Ukrainian Catholic priest since 1985, is pastor of Holy Trinity Church in Kerhonkson, NY and St. John the Baptist Church in Hunter, NY. He is the author of a book about Bishop Ortynsky (2016), in addition to three others, including one about Metropolitan Andrei Sheptytsky (published in Ukrainian in 2003, and in English in 2013), The Education of Ukrainian Greek Catholic Clergy (1882-1946) (English edition in 2005, and Ukrainian in 2006), and editor of Ukrainian Catholics in America: A History (2017). Formerly, Vice Rector, Academic Dean and Lecturer at St. Basil College Seminary in Stamford, CT. He also lectured at Sacred Heart University (Fairfield, CT) and the U.S. Air Force Academy during Basic Cadet Training in Colorado Springs Colorado. He is a retired U.S. Air Force Reserve Chaplain having served from 1989 to 2010.

Rhoda Miller, Ed.D., CG has been a Certified Genealogist since 1998 specializing in Jewish research and Holocaust studies. Rhoda is a Past President of the Jewish Genealogy Society of Long Island (JGSLI) and continues as a board member. With JGSLI, she led the award-winning project of publishing the Images of America book, Jewish Community of Long Island. Rhoda presents regularly at the annual conference of the International Association of Jewish Genealogy Societies as well as at libraries and community organizations.

Zbigniew Stettner resides in Poland within the former Province of Galicia.  His paternal roots are in the far east of Galicia and his maternal from the far west (Biała Krakowska). He has almost all nationalities and almost all religions among his ancestors (Polish, German, Ukrainian, Lutheran, Greek-Catholic, Roman Catholic, in various combinations). He has been doing genealogical research in Poland, Ukraine, Belarus and Lithuania for last 10 years. While he conducts research in archives, his favorite part of the job is visiting ancestral villages, finding places and people and re-uniting the families.