Personal papers

 

John Jowa was a Ukrainian post-World War II refugee to the United States from the Soviet Union, where he was persecuted for being a member of a landowning family during Stalin's forced collectivization. He was active in two associations of former Ukrainian political prisoners in New York City. The collection contains records of those organizations, as well as his autobiographical and historical writings.

 

This collection is not processed, and is not yet directly accessible to researchers. 

Stefan Maksymjuk is a resident of Silver Spring, Maryland, and has been a long-time collector of early Ukrainian phonograph recordings and recordist of Ukrainian American events, speeches, interviews, concerts, and other community functions. His collection includes over 200 1/4" open reel tapes, over 800 cassettes, and many early 78 rpm shellac discs.

Marie Halun Bloch is best known for her Ukrainian-themed children's books, but also was a writer and translator on a variety of subjects. She did considerable research into her family history and the history of her ancestral villages. She travelled to Ukraine and Eastern Europe beginning in the 1960s through the 1990s, and wrote extensively about her experiences. This collection contains her published and unpublished writings on her genealogy, the history of her ancestral villages, travel accounts, research notes, correspondence, and photographs.

 

This collection houses the personal and professional papers of the writer, linguist, and editor Vasyl' Chaplenko. It documents his studies of the Ukrainian language, politics, and literature through typescripts of his articles, his correspondence, and through his large collection of annotated newspaper and periodical articles.

 

This collection houses the personal papers of Fr. Petro Stel'makh, a Ukrainian Orthodox clergyman who was active in German displaced persons camps, and played a significant role in the breakaway "Conciliar" Ukrainian Autocephalous Orthodox Church. It also contains administrative records of the UAOC(C), and records from Ukrainian Orthodox parishes in German displaced persons camps.

This "micro-collection" contains a small group of sermons and notes written by the first bishop of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church in America.

This collection houses the personal and professional papers of Fr. Gregory Chomicky, a "first wave" (pre-World War I) Ukrainian immigrant to the United States. It contains material related to his work as a clergyman, both as a parish priest and as a member of the leadership of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church in America and the Ukrainian Orthodox Church of the USA. It also documents his personal and family life as well as parish and Ukrainian-American community activities.

 

This collection is not processed, and is not yet directly accessible to researchers. Mykola Francuzenko was a Ukrainian-American writer (under the pseudonym Mykola Virnyi), translator, theatrical director, radio journalist, and social activist. His literary output includes over 400 works, and he was a writer and broadcaster for the Ukrainian services of both Radio Liberty and the Voice of America during the Cold War.

The Volodymyr and Katherine Kedrowsky Papers contain primary source material regarding Volodymyr's activities as a diplomat for the Ukrainian People's Republic, as director of the Ukrainian service of the Voice of America, and his political and historical writings. It also includes photographs and ephemera related to Katherine's work with Girl Scouting and Ukrainian women's affairs.

This collection contains music manuscripts and song lyrics by a Ukrainian-American immigrant to Northapton, Pennsylvania, as well as an intruiging bilingual glossary of millitary drill commands.

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